The transfer to Salzburg made waves, but I didn’t expect such hostility.

The transfer to Salzburg made waves, but I didn’t expect such hostility.

In 2001 Lothar Matthäus was your trainer at Rapid. What memories do you have of him? Lothar Matthäus was a world footballer and exceptional professional. He played along in training time and again and showed us how to do it. He was in top shape and a leader. I soaked up everything he said. It’s a shame that we weren’t able to show what he expected from us with Rapid.

Salzburg was having a difficult time, you were met with hostility from the Rapid fans. Some of them were insulted. It was a tough phase. The transfer to Salzburg made waves, but I did not expect this hostility. But the quick step abroad has given me back the fun of football.

How did you feel when Rapid fans were in the stands? It was really an exceptional situation that was difficult to deal with. It took a long time to process the whole thing. That shaped me, I have become more robust and have got a thicker coat. That certainly helped me for my international career.

You also needed a thick skin in the German Bundesliga under your coach Thomas Tuchel in Mainz. I was particularly influenced by two coaches: Pepi Hickersberger was a very important figure for me with his humanity and great football skills and, on the other hand, Thomas Tuchel with his extreme ambition. Tuchel was very, very demanding, he pushed you in every training session.

It probably wasn’t always easy to deal with. There have been phases in which he was very direct. Some players broke because of it. I had a lot of discussions with him, we often offended each other, but overall we benefited a lot from each other. If you want to be a professional, you have to go through it.

The superstars earn dizzying salaries. Is that morally okay? This has developed in leaps and bounds over the past 15 years. When clubs have very high revenues, it is normal for players’ fees to go up too. Is that morally justifiable? If you compare it to the merit of many others, probably not.

“Whether or not each transfer was correct is an open question, but I stand by my decisions.”

In Austria you were considered a talent of the century. Have you achieved what you set out to do? A question I’ve been asked a lot. I am very happy with my career. Whether or not each transfer was correct is a matter of debate, but I stand by my decisions 100 percent. I’ve played more than 500 professional games, and that number alone says a lot.

Your vision of life? Go through life with joy and enjoy it, but with humility and respect for others. And I want to be a good father and husband to my family. They have put back a lot over the years and given me so much support that I am now trying to be there for them and give something back.

About the person: Andreas Ivanschitz (37), born in Eisenstadt, started his career at ASK Baumgarten. 19 years of professional footballer, was champion with Rapid, Seattle and Pilsen.123 search He also played in the Spanish Primera División with Levante UD and with 1. FSV Mainz 05 in the German Bundesliga, and has played more than 500 mandatory games. Under the then team boss Hans Krankl, he was made the youngest ÖFB team captain of the post-war period at the age of 19. Andreas Ivanschitz played twice in the Champions League: in 2005 with Rapid, in 2008 with Panathinaikos Athens. In 2003 he was voted Austria’s Footballer of the Year. Married, three children, now lives with his family again in Vienna.

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The German tennis star Alexander Zverev hit the negative headlines just under a week after the Adria tour was prematurely canceled because of another party visit. The world number seven was seen on an Instagram story by fashion designer Philipp Plein at a party in his home town of Monaco on Sunday. The video has since been deleted.

However, a copy made by US tennis journalist Ben Rothenberg continues to circulate on Twitter. Zverev took part in the Adria Tour initiated by Novak Djokovic in June together with Dominic Thiem and other tennis stars. Disregarding the distance and hygiene rules in the fight against the corona virus, Djokovic and Co. celebrated a lively party in a Belgrade nightclub. Both Djokovic and Grigor Dimitrov, Borna Coric and Viktor Troicki were promptly tested positive for Covid-19.

Repentance in a party mood

A week ago, Zverev apologized in a statement to all those he may have put at risk for playing on this tour. The 23-year-old announced that he would go into self-isolation and undergo further tests. The corona tests carried out were all negative.

“How selfish can you be?”

The tennis scene noted with dismay that Zverev has apparently not complied with the quarantine period. Nick Kyrgios spoke up most clearly: “How selfish can you be?” Asked the Australian in his Instagram story. “If you are so bold as to publish this prepared statement from your management that you isolate yourself for 14 days and apologize to everyone, stay at home for 14 days.”

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The ÖVP is the clear winner of the Styrian municipal council elections in 2020. The SPÖ, the Greens and the NEOS were also successful. The KPÖ kept its number of seats, the Freedom Party lost heavily. It was the first elections in Austria in the times of Corona, taking health precautions. Voter turnout – despite the postal voting record – fell by around 10 percentage points compared to 2015.

The Styrian municipal council elections were a kind of test run for the municipal elections in Vienna and Vorarlberg in autumn – there are also mayoral elections in the state.

In the overall result of all 285 municipalities (there was no election in Graz), the ÖVP won strong nationwide, the SPÖ remained almost the same, the blues lost in many municipalities. The small parties KPÖ, Greens and NEOS grew slightly.

Specifically, the ÖVP increased from 42.72 to 47.18 percent. The SPÖ came to 31.86 percent after 31.57. The FPÖ fell from 13.86 to 8.2 percent. The Greens gained 1.42 percentage points to 4.75 percent. The KPÖ recorded an increase from 1.53 to 1.64 percent, NEOS from 0.39 to 0.61 percent. 804,095 people were eligible to vote (2015: 800,811).

FPÖ and lists crash

In addition to the FPÖ, the other lists were also among the losers in the municipal council elections: they totaled 5.76 percent. In 2015 it was 6.60 percent. In addition to the Schladming area, the citizen lists also scored particularly well in Krieglach, where the Stepwieser list traditionally takes first place.

In some cities there were surprising changes of power, such as in the Upper Styrian pilgrimage town of Mariazell from SPÖ to ÖVP, as well as in the railway town of Selzthal. The social democrats also lost the deep red iron ore to the blacks, and the traditionally strong KPÖ also lost mandates here. In Trofaiach in Upper Styria – there was already a strong deputy mayor in Gabi Leitenberger – the communists swung themselves up to be the second strongest party behind the SPÖ.

Boom for the SPÖ

The SPÖ was able to expand its majority in most of Upper, West and East Styria industrial cities such as Knittelfeld, Kapfenberg, Bruck / Mur or Mürzzuschlag and often even achieve a two-thirds majority – which was not a matter of course in previous elections. The ÖVP made many gains and turned some cities such as Frohnleiten or Köflach to a sensational extent, but also lost traditionally strong areas such as the tourist three in the far north-west of the country – Schladming, Ramsau am Dachstein and Haus / Ennstal to citizen lists. The issue of the Leitspital in the Liezen district apparently did not harm the ÖVP in the communities where the hospitals are located (which are to become health centers, note). The ÖVP defended the Absolute in the previously deep red Bad Aussee and took first place in Rottenmann. In Rottenmann, the FPÖ, which was critical of the Leitspital, flew out of the parish hall, and the KPÖ, which was also critical of reform, won a seat.

The ÖVP increased from 2,475 to 2,690 mandates. The SPÖ took 1,544 (2015: 1,564) municipal council seats. The KPÖ increased its number of seats slightly to 39 (2015: 38), the FPÖ suffered heavy losses, it fell from 605 to 328. The target set in March before the suspension of the election planned for March 22 because of the corona virus, in 18 municipalities winning the mayor was far from being achieved. The Greens jumped significantly from 110 to 178 seats in the community rooms. NEOS also succeeded in the modest area, they secured a small increase from 8 to 11 mandates.

Election winner is surprised

Governor Hermann Schützenhöfer (ÖVP) was happy about a “surprising result in this dimension”. LHStv. Anton Lang (SPÖ) was also satisfied: “It looks like we’ve stopped the downward trend.” The Styrian FPÖ boss Mario Kunasek said: “This is not a good day for the Freedom Party.” There was no tailwind at the federal level and also the corona crisis. KPÖ club chairwoman Claudia Klimt-Weithaler was satisfied with the small increases. Green club chairwoman Sandra Krautwaschl was “incredibly happy” about the large increase in mandates. The voters were aware of the important issues such as climate and the environment. NEOS club boss Niko Swatek spoke of the best pink result in the Styrian municipal council elections.

The preliminary overall result already includes the postal vote, the votes cast on the early election day (March 13th) and other voting cards. Despite the new record for voting cards issued (173,366 more than three times as much as last time), voter turnout fell to 62.64 percent (2015: 73.36 percent) – and this was pretty evenly distributed across the country, regardless of whether Corona hotspot or not. On election day there had been exceptionally extensive hygiene measures, no citizen had to be afraid of infection.

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“ZiB” star and author Tarek Leitner describes the youth of his father Alfred in his new book. A personal journey into the past

His latest book is his most personal to date, says “ZiB” anchor Tarek Leitner: In “Berlin-Vienna” he describes two journeys that his father Alfred undertook as a child and adolescent. In 1938, the then twelve-year-old drove from Berlin to Linz at home with his father – in a brand-new, steel-blue DKW that they had picked up straight from the factory. Seven years later, the world looked very different. And again the now 19-year-old soldier tried to come home, much less comfortably, in the turmoil of the Second World War, which was just ending.

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What is a human life? How do we become what we are? Leitner tries to answer these questions

Book*

(Brandstätter, 30 euros).

News: Many of us know surprisingly little about the lives of our parents and grandparents. You take a lot for granted, and it is only when the old people are dead that you realize that there are large gaps in knowledge. In your book you realize that you too had to first discover that your father’s life was more than just an everyday, little fate. When did you realize this? Tarek Leitner: It really became clear to me when I tried to put the scattered anecdotes that I knew into one coherent story. And so that I can do that, I conducted very structured interviews with my father.

When was it? Between 2004 and 2006. I wanted to put the life story on his 80th birthday in a journalistic form, which was originally only intended for family purposes. In 2008 my father died. The nice thing is that at the hour of his death I was aware that we had actually discussed everything. And 14 years later I am fortunate enough to have a very important source with these recordings and transcripts.

How do you ask your father about a very difficult, long past time, about war, death and privation – hard inquiries or rather indulgent? You have to find the right mix. There is hardly an interview that you do that has such an emotional level. First I had to let my father forget the microphone, that happened relatively quickly. But then of course it is also important to get involved in saying: “Now tell your whole story. The way you think you have experienced it, remembered it, or simply felt it.” After I was out of my wild years of politicization, I was able to deal with it.